Fuck I need to catch up on my Elementary… Mrs. Hudson, Moriarty! Elementary is great. It shows him gradually episode by episode becoming the Sherlock we recognize. It is a brilliant approach… We begin with a man named Sherlock Holmes, an emotional trainwreck in New York City, ahead of the curb. Joan Watson helps him to become a better person, thus Holmes finds his Watson, next comes his Mrs. Hudson and finally that evil Napoleon of Crime, Moriarty…. Oh Moriarty how I love saying that.. And Adler, oh Irene Adler… Ladies and gentlemen Sherlock Holmes has finally arrived on CBS…

Fuck I need to catch up on my Elementary… Mrs. Hudson, Moriarty! Elementary is great. It shows him gradually episode by episode becoming the Sherlock we recognize. It is a brilliant approach… We begin with a man named Sherlock Holmes, an emotional trainwreck in New York City, ahead of the curb. Joan Watson helps him to become a better person, thus Holmes finds his Watson, next comes his Mrs. Hudson and finally that evil Napoleon of Crime, Moriarty…. Oh Moriarty how I love saying that.. And Adler, oh Irene Adler… Ladies and gentlemen Sherlock Holmes has finally arrived on CBS…

begrudginglybelligerentbird said: Hi! I’m with the Sherlock Committee for Tumbl-Con USA (tumblconusa[.]com), and we're looking for Sherlock Holmes fans to help us promote! As a fan of, like, 8 billion versions of Holmes, I'm in charge of bringing *all* fans of Sherlock Holmes to the convention too. As your blog features many Holmeses, I'd really love your help. If you could keep an eye out for Tumbl-Con and SherlockCommittee posts at sherlockcommittee[.]tumblr to reblog, we'd really appreciate it! Thank you!

There are about 125 different Holmes not a billion. But mmk….

whoniverseconfessions:

‘I hate Susan, I hate the Doctor’s grandchild. She is just so annoying, so shallow, such a whining crying baby. I know, she IS a child, but for god sake, it is not possible to be more annoying than her.’

whoniverseconfessions:

I hate Susan, I hate the Doctor’s grandchild. She is just so annoying, so shallow, such a whining crying baby. I know, she IS a child, but for god sake, it is not possible to be more annoying than her.’

Yeah baby!

Yeah baby!

The Tenth Doctor faces an old enemy when Terileptil convicts break out of the penal world of Raaga and in a quick twist, the Judoon crash the party to recapture them.

The Tenth Doctor faces an old enemy when Terileptil convicts break out of the penal world of Raaga and in a quick twist, the Judoon crash the party to recapture them.

The TARDIS materialises as a sedan chair in the middle of the Priestley Riots of 1791 and the First Doctor and Susan embark on one of their earliest adventures.

The TARDIS materialises as a sedan chair in the middle of the Priestley Riots of 1791 and the First Doctor and Susan embark on one of their earliest adventures.

12 decades of Sherlock Holmes

12 decades of Sherlock Holmes

Sherlock History Lesson


Sherlock Holmes Begins
It all began in 1900 with a half-minute mutoscope flick advertising the latest special effects of the times while simultaneously mocking Sherlock’s cocaine addiction. 1905 had Maurice Costello champion the lead role in the first serious Sherlock Holmes film and he possibly came back for seconds in 1906 but we don’t know. 1907 bore an Italian rip-off that managed to plagiarise Holmes without getting caught by the copyright police. We got a Hungarian Holmes in Bauman Karoly as 1908 started. Viggo Larsen was the first major Sherlock Holmes, he began as the star of a dodecalogy by Nordisk Films, he left after completing five films during 1908-1910; he did not participate in the third instalment of 1909 and had been replaced by Einar Zangenberg for that occasion. Otto Lagoni took over the part for two 1910 films but grew wearisome quickly and hasty replacements were desperately needed to complete that year; Alwin Neuß who had been Larsen’s Dr. Watson was temporarily promoted to playing Sherlock while they scrambled to cast a proper Holmes. Einar Zangenberg reluctantly played the part again and finally they found Lauritz Olsen to make their penultimate film as 1911 signed their death warrant and they lured Otto Lagoni back into the role to finish the series. Viggo Larsen had left to film another series being made by a German Vitascope company and made six more Sherlock films all by himself from 1910-1911. It was 1912 began the reign of the Frenchman, George Tréville, he adapted The Speckled Band, The Reigate Squires, The Beryl Coronet, The Copper Beeches, The Boscombe Valley Mystery, The Naval Treaty, Silver Blaze and he left as soon as 1913 started, but only after adapting The Musgrave Ritual. Harry Benham had the honours of adapting The Sign of the Four and then Ferdinand Bonn first emerged in 1914, we also got Alwin Neuß back; continuing until 1917 he was the definitive Holmes, making seven films. 1914 was still a big year, James Bragington adapted A Study in Scarlet for the first time and Francis Ford followed suite in the United States. 1916 was another big year, the legendary William Gillette leapt off the stage and onto film for the one time only while The Valley of Fear was first adapted by someone who shared the performances of Gillette’s play, this was Harry Arthur Saintsbury. 1917 said goodbye to Alwin Neuß and the reign of Hugo Flink began for a short time, he made three films and did one more for 1918 before leaving, Ferdinand Bonn came back to make his own four films and Viggo Larsen did another Sherlock film for old times’ sake. 1919 didn’t have much just Kurt Brenkendorff trying out the part and that was it. You all know the rest, Eille Norwood, John Barrymore, Clive Brook, Arthur Wontner, Basil Rathbone….

Indeed

Indeed